A study of Caffeine on our Health

According to The Sun “Consuming up to four cups of coffee a day carries no health risks, experts say. Scientists said those who stick to this limitation have no need to worry”.

This was based on an overview of studies which looked at the effects of caffeine on health. The researchers specifically investigated the impact of having more or less than 400mg of caffeine every day for adults (the equivalent of four cups of coffee), or 300mg/day (three cups) for pregnant women.

These amounts (400mg for adults and 300mg for pregnant women) were the recommended upper daily limits from a previous large-scale review of caffeine safety completed in 2003.

Overall, the researchers discovered the available evidence suggests that consuming up to these amounts of caffeine doesn’t have a negative impact on bone health, heart health, behavior or reproduction, and development.

They discovered links with increased stress, higher blood pressure and headaches. Although these symptoms may not necessarily lead to adverse health outcomes in the long run, they want further additional research. Presently the NHS recommends pregnant women have no more than 200mg of caffeine per day — less than the recommended upper limit in this study. Pregnant women should plan to stick to this 200mg per day limit as it will reduce any risks even further.

Presently the NHS recommends pregnant women have no more than 200mg of caffeine per day — less than the recommended upper limit in this study. Pregnant women should plan to stick to this 200mg per day limits it will reduce any health risks even further.

An important thing for consideration to remember is that caffeine is present in lots of products aside from coffee, including tea, cola drinks, energy drinks, caffeine pills (including caffeine anhydrous) and chocolate.

Where did the story come originate?

The study was completed by researchers from various institutions in the USA, with most of the authors coming from ToxStrategies, a business which manufactures and processes drugs for human use.

The study was published in the peer-reviewed journal Food and Chemical Toxicology and is open-access, which means that it is free to read on line.

The study was financed by the North American Branch of International Life Sciences Institute Caffeine Working Group. Grants were also obtained from the American Beverage Association and the National Coffee Association. The authors assert that these funders had no input to the systematic review or inspection.

Johnston
 

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